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Lesson Plan   



 
    Lesson Information
     
 
    Outcomes and Standards
    Objectives
    Assessment
     
   
    Resources
    Materials
    Vocabulary
    Procedures
    Day Plans
    Enrichment Options
     
   
    Teacher Reflection
     



Stage 1
Identify Desired Results


Catchy Title: Sadako: A Tribute to a Girl With Cancer
Theme/Topic of Lesson: Japanese Culture/Leukemia
Time Commitment: Three 90-minute periods
Subject Area(s):
    Arts
    Language Arts
    Science
Grade Level(s): 5,6,7,8
Standards Alignment:
Class Challenge Question: What are some ways to make living with cancer more bearable?
Overview:

Part I of this lesson begins by learning the story of a girl named Sadako Sasaki, a 12-year-old girl living in Japan in 1955. That year she contracted "the atomic bomb disease," or leukemia, from radiation caused by the bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945. While hospitalized by this debilitating disease, her friend shares the legend of the paper crane.

Her friend explains that by folding one thousand paper cranes, the gods may grant her returned good health. With great hope, Sadako set about folding paper cranes. Sadly, Sadako died before she had folded 1,000 cranes. After her death, her classmates raised money to build a Children's Monument in the Hiroshima Peace Park.

Through this lesson, students will learn the story of Sadako, create a chain of paper cranes, design a fund-raising event, and write poems in the Japanese style of haiku.

Student accommodations will be made as per Individual Education Plans, 504 plans, and the Electronic and Information Technology Accessibility Standards of COMAR.

Before teaching this lesson, the teacher should become familiar with the story of Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by reading one of the books that are mentioned in the resource section of this lesson or by listening to the compact disc. The teacher should be able to fold a paper crane in order to assist students.

In order to complete this lesson, the students must be knowledgeable about how to use Inspiration software.  Students should have a rudimentary knowledge of the bombing of Hiroshima. Students should also be able to find a Web site when given a URL.   Student groups will be teacher-selected.  Groups should be selected to have more able students working with less able students. 

This lesson integrates science, social studies, language arts, fine arts, and technology.  The science/health area explored is the study of disease.  The social studies content explored is the study of Asia, particularly Japan.  Japanese history, art, and literature are examined.  From the language arts area, poetry is explored in the examination and writing of haiku.  The folding of paper cranes falls in the domain of the fine arts.  The use of computers, the Internet, and various software fall in the area of technology.



Stage 2
Determine Acceptable Evidence


Skills and Processes
(K-12)
Maryland Content Standards Indicators
Students will explain how the nature of science has affected scientific inquiry, technology, and the history of science.
 
Life Science
(K-12)
Maryland Content Standards Indicators
Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time.
 
Life Science
(6-8)
Maryland Content Standards
Students will use scientific skills and processes to explain the dynamic nature of living things, their interactions, and the results from the interactions that occur over time.
Maryland State Indicators
3.8.3
analyze concepts (i.e., diseases, deficiencies, toxins, and other factors) that promote or disrupt the structure and function of living organisms. (MLO 3.3.)
Skills and Processes
(6-8)
Maryland Content Standards
Students will explain how the nature of science has affected scientific inquiry, technology, and the history of science.
Maryland State Indicators
1.8.16
modify ideas based on new information from developmentally appropriate readings, data, and the ideas of others. (MLO 1.2.6.)
Skills and Processes
(6-8)
Maryland Content Standards
Students will explain how the nature of science has affected scientific inquiry, technology, and the history of science.
Maryland State Indicators
1.8.1
access and process information from readings, investigations, and /or oral communications. (MLO 1.1.1.)
Skills and Processes
(6-8)
Maryland Content Standards
Students will explain how the nature of science has affected scientific inquiry, technology, and the history of science.
Maryland State Indicators
1.8.2
formulate questions, which lead to the development of a testable hypothesis. (MLO 1.1.2.)
Technology research tools
(Gr. 6-8)
ISTE Technology Standards

5. Technology research tools

  • Students use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources.
  • Students use technology tools to process data and report results.
  • Students evaluate and select new information resources and technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
ISTE Technology Performance Indicators
Use content-specific tool

Use content-specific tools, software, and simulations (e.g., environmental probes, graphing calculators, exploratory environments, Web tools) to support learning and research.

Technology productivity tools
(Gr. 6-8)
ISTE Technology Standards

3. Technology productivity tools

  • Students use technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity.
  • Students use productivity tools to collaborate in constructing technology-enhanced models, prepare publications, and produce other creative works.
ISTE Technology Performance Indicators
Apply productivity/multim

Apply productivity/multimedia tools and peripherals to support personal productivity, group collaboration, and learning throughout the curriculum.

Technology research tools
(Gr. 6-8)
ISTE Technology Standards

5. Technology research tools

  • Students use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources.
  • Students use technology tools to process data and report results.
  • Students evaluate and select new information resources and technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
ISTE Technology Performance Indicators
Design, develop, publish

Design, develop, publish and present products (e.g., Web pages, videotapes) using technology resources that demonstrate and communicate curriculum concepts to audiences inside and outside the classroom

Technology research tools
(Gr. 6-8)
ISTE Technology Standards

5. Technology research tools

  • Students use technology to locate, evaluate, and collect information from a variety of sources.
  • Students use technology tools to process data and report results.
  • Students evaluate and select new information resources and technological innovations based on the appropriateness for specific tasks.
ISTE Technology Performance Indicators
Select and use appropriat

Select and use appropriate tools and technology resources to accomplish a variety of tasks and solve problems.



Learning Objectives:

The Students will:
  • Identify characteristics of leukemia.
  • Construct a paper chain of origami cranes.
  • Design a fundraiser for a cancer organization.
  • Create an original poem in the Japanese style of haiku.
  • Use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas
    effectively to multiple audiences.
  • Use technology to locate, evaluate and collect information from a variety of sources.

Assessment
Rubrics are provided to assess the "Let the Fund-Raising Begin" and the haiku activities.
 
* "Let the Fund-Raising Begin" Rubric
* Haiku Rubric



Stage 3
Plan Learning Experiences


Resources

Other TechnologyVCR
Compact Disc Player
Internet-connected computers
Document Camera
LCD Projector
SoftwareInspiration A powerful visual learning tool that helps students to develop and organize ideas.
To order call 800-877-4292 or order online at www.inspiration.com

  http://www.inspiration.com
Print MaterialsSadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes. Coerr, Eleanor. New York: Puffin Books. 1999.
Sadako. Coerr, Eleanor. New York: The Putnam & Grosset Group. 1993.
One Thousand Paper Cranes. Ishii, Takayuki.  New York: Random House Inc. 1997.
Shin's Tricycle. Kodama, Tatsuharu.  New York: Walker and Company. 1995.
A Thousand Cranes. Temko, Florence. California: Heian International, Inc. 1998.
Haiku: This Other World. Wright, Richard. New York: Random House, Inc. 1998.
Yami's Origami. Yamauchi, Yoichi.  New Jersey: Woodbridge Publishing Company. 1998
Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes Coerr, Ellen. , Prince Frederick, MD : Recorded Books, p2002, c1977.
Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes Coerr, Ellen. , Stanford, California: Dancing Cat Records. 1995.
Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes Coerr, Ellen. , Old Greenwich, CT : Listening Library, p1990.
The Haiku Society of America Purchase Information: 
HAS Education Committee 
c/o Pamela Miller Ness 33 Riverside Drive, Apt. 4-G 
New York, New York 10023 
http://www.hsa-haiku.org/
  http://www.hsa-haiku.org/
Video(s)Club Write: Poetry Purchase information:
Agency for Instructional Technology
Box A 1800 North Stonelake Drive
Bloomington, IN 27402-0120
1-800-457 4509   
www.ait.net
  http://www.ait.net
The Sadako Film Project Purchase information:
The Sadako Project, 
P.O. Box 67, Santa Cruz, CA 95063
(800) 827-0949
How to Fold a Paper Crane Purchase information:
The Sadako Project, 
P.O. Box 67, Santa Cruz, CA 95063
(800) 827-0949
Internet SitesHaiku Society of America This resource site is primarily maintained for its members but also offers resources for teachers.
  http://www.hsa-haiku.org/
In the Moonlight a Worm... This reference Web site offers teachers and students an introduction to writing haiku poems, a chance to study the history and nature of haiku poetry and an introduction to the fundamental principles of creative writing.
  http://www.haiku.insouthsea.co.uk/
Childhood Leukemia Center This research/reference site offers information for the caregivers of children with leukemia or other cancers.
  http://www.patientcenters.com/leukemia/
Leukemia and Lymphoma Society This reference site offers information, support and guidance to persons living with blood-related cancers and to professionals who are involved in their care.
  http://www.leukemia-lymphoma.org/
Math In Motion This educational Web site offers resources that link mathematics and origami.
  http://www.mathinmotion.com/
Paperfolding.com This reference Web site offers information about origami and many beautiful color photographs.
  http://www.paperfolding.com/
Thousand Cranes Peace Network This reference Web site offers information on how to fold a paper crane and where to send paper cranes.
  http://rosella.apana.org.au/~mlb/cranes/index.htm
Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes This educational Web site aims to help educators use the story of Sadako to teach children the power of war, the difference one person can make and values cherished in all cultures.
  http://www.sadako.com/
Video Utilization Strategies Use these resources for effectively utilizing video in your classroom curricula, including techniques like previewing, segmenting, script writing, and providing a focus for viewing, just to mention a few. Make video an active learning experience for all of your students.
  http://www.members.aol.com/teacher643/mpt/vus.html#

Materials
Per class
  • computer with Internet access
  • VCR and monitor or Compact Disc Player
  • video projection device

  • Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes compact disc, movie, or book
  • a spool of heavy thread
  • a button
  • a large-eyed needle
  • one sheet of chart paper
  • marker
Per student team/group of 4
  • Investigating Leukemia WebQuest  (View)
  • Computer with Inspiration software installed on it or a piece of chart paper and a
    marker
Per Student
  • 7 Points to Writing Haiku  (View)
  • Haiku Appeal  (View)
  • Let the Fundraising Begin Letter  (View)
  • 2 pieces of Origami paper
  • several pieces of square 6"x6" scrap paper
  • Instructions for how to fold an origami crane
Not Specified
  • Haiku Scoring Rubric  (View)
  • Rubric for Let the Fundraising Begin  (View)

Vocabulary
  • Haiku - an unrhymed verse form of Japanese origin having three lines containing usually 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively, oftentimes having a seasonal reference
  • Leukemia - a cancer of the white blood cells, which starts in the bone marrow but can then spread to the blood, lymph nodes, the spleen, liver, central nervous system and other organs
  • Origami - the art or process of Japanese paper folding
  • Prognosis - the prospect of recovery as anticipated from the usual course of disease or peculiarities of the case

Procedures
The students will work both individually and cooperatively throughout this lesson. The
classroom should be equipped with a mini-lab with enough Internet-connected computers
for each group of 3 to 4 students to use. Each computer needs to be equipped with
Inspiration software. Students can learn the story of Sadako in a variety of ways that can
be modified for high achievers as well as low-achieving students. Students who are high
achievers can be assigned to read Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes in advance of
the lesson, on their own. Students who are visual learners can be shown the video of the
story and auditory learners can be played an audio version of the story. Low-achieving
students can combine a variety of these techniques. Also, much of the lesson will be
conducted with the students in cooperative groups. Less able students should be grouped
with more able students to assist in collaborative learning. Specific accommodations will
be made according to student IEP’s and 504 plans and in accordance with COMAR
regulations.
Day 1: The Story of Sadako and her Cranes: Origami and Sadako
Daily Challenge Question: Using just an ordinary piece of paper and nothing else, how can you make a piece of paper art?
1 Day
Set-up Directions:
The story Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes can be presented in a variety of ways according to the needs of the students. The students can listen to a recording of the story on the compact disc, Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes, watch The Sadako Film Project video, or read the picture book or the short novel by Eleanor Coerr.

If the students are watching the video or listening to a recording, appropriate equipment must be secured. After hearing the story, the students will learn how to fold a paper crane. The teacher will need to print out copies of directions on how to fold a paper cranes. Instructions for making a paper crane can be found at the following web address http://www.sadako.com/howtofold.html or in either of the origami books listed in the resource section of this lesson plan.  The teacher will need to secure paper for the origami activity. 


Teacher Presentation & Motivation:

Today's lesson is the motivation for the next two days of lessons. The students will hear the touching true story of Sadako Sasaki, a twelve-year-old girl who died of leukemia caused by radiation from the bombing of Hiroshima. 

The teacher should hold up a piece of paper and ask, "What is this?" The students will recognize it as a piece of paper.  The teacher will respond, "No.  It's a bird - a crane in fact. Here, let me show you."  The teacher then will demonstrate how to fold it into an origami crane.  This would best be done using on the stage of a document camera and displayed with an LCD projector. 



Activity 1 - Sadako's Cranes
Students will learn the story of Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes. The story will
be delivered in one of the following ways: by watching a video, listening to a recording,
or listening to the teacher read the story. This lesson can be differentiated by having
higher achieving students read the novel, Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes, on
their own before this lesson begins. Also, students who are visual learners can watch the
video while audio learners can listen to the recording.

Activity 2 - Our Cranes
Students will receive instructions for how to fold a paper crane either via a handout or
projected onto a screen from the Internet. The students will be given pieces of square
scrap paper to practice folding the cranes. The teacher should demonstrate each step of
the paper folding.  This can be modeled on the stage of a document camera to appeal to
visual learning modalities. If a document camera is not available, the teacher can show
the video "How to Fold a Paper Crane" while assisting students who are having
difficulty. Through the media interaction students will be able to perform a specific task
to complete after t

Wrap Up:
The teacher will say, "Today we learned how to make paper cranes.  Sadako was not able to complete her goal of a thousand cranes before cancer took her.  Tomorrow we will learn more about the disease that so tragically ended her life."
Day 2: Making a Difference: Designing a Fundraiser
Daily Challenge Question: How can I help researchers find a cure for cancer?
1 Day
Set-up Directions:
One copy of the "Investigating Leukemia Web Walk" handout must be made for each group of 3-4 students. Each group of 3 to 4 students should have an Internet-connected computer with Inspiration software installed. If this technology configuration is not a possibility, the teacher should provide each group with a marker and chart paper for the brainstorming and copies of the Web site. The teacher will also need to duplicate one "Let the Fundraising Begin" handouts for each student.


Teacher Presentation & Motivation:
The teacher will remind students that Sadako died because she had leukemia, which, in her case, was caused by radiation. The teacher will note that there are still many children affected by leukemia and other childhood cancers. The students will be divided into groups of 3-4 students that have been pre-selected by the teacher.  Students will learn more about leukemia through a Web Walk. Give the students about 15 minutes to complete the WebWalk and discuss their findings. If the teacher feels it would be expeditious, the sites can be presented to the class as a whole using a large monitor such as found in the Destination systems or by projecting on a screen using an LCD projector. 


Activity 1 - Brainstorming (15 minutes)
The teacher will say, "Yesterday we learned about Sadako and today you learned more about leukemia. Now you will create a fund-raising proposal that will help honor her memory."

Activity 2 - Fundraising Proposal (65 minutes)
Have students return to their seats and pass out the "Let the Fundraising Begin" worksheet. Read the instructions orally to the class. Then, give the students time to write their proposals.

Wrap Up:
During the last 10 minutes of class, call on students to share their proposal ideas.  Tell the students, "The crane is a symbol of happiness, peace, and long life in Japan.  In fact, nature holds many important symbols for the Japanese.  Tomorrow, we will learn about a kind of poetry in which nature is often used to create a picture in the reader's mind."


Day 3: Japanese Poetry Study: Haiku
Daily Challenge Question: How can only a few words paint a picture in your mind?
1 Day
Set-up Directions:
Prepare one copy per student of each of the handouts, "7 Points for Writing Haiku" and "Haiku Appeal." You will also need a piece of chart paper and a marker for creating a list of characteristics that the class identifies in a haiku.

Teacher Presentation & Motivation:
The teacher will begin by introducing to the students to what a haiku poem is. The teacher should share that haiku began in Japan and is the shortest form of poem generally known. A haiku is usually divided into three word groups, oftentimes falling into the 5-7-5 syllable pattern. The teacher should point out that haiku appeal to us through images and our sensual perceptions of things. Also, haiku oftentimes makes seasonal references.

Activity 1 - Introduction to Haiku (25 minutes)
Each student will receive the "Haiku Appeal" sheet which contains several haiku, some written by children age 8 -12. Give each student 5 minutes to read through the sheet of haiku and to select one that appeals to them and to think of reasons for their selections. Each student will read their chosen poem and will give reasons for choosing it.

Next, ask the students to list common characteristics of haiku as they observe them on the handout. Write the observations on a sheet of chart paper.

Pass out the "7 Points about writing Haiku" handout. Discuss each of the seven points briefly with the class.

Activity 2 - Writing Haiku (50 minutes)
Next, the students will begin writing some of their own haiku. The subject matter of haiku may be either remembered personal experience or immediate experience. Students should be reminded of the challenge question, of the crane, and of Sadako's plight. Encourage students to use these ideas in the creation of their Haiku. However, students are not limited to those topics and images.  If you must keep your students indoors they will probably be restricted to remembered experiences. If you can take them outside, however, they can better write from immediate experience. Encourage your students to write 3 or 4 haiku.

After the students have written their haiku, have those who wish share theirs with the class.

Wrap Up:
Students share their haiku with the class.

Enrichment Options
Community Connection
After the students have designed a fund-raiser for a cancer organization, have students present their ideas. All ideas will be discussed and the class will select one of the ideas to implement as a service-learning project. After completing this three-day lesson, the students will visit a nearby elementary school where they will share the story of Sadako and will teach the youngsters how to fold a paper crane. The class can publish a magazine containing selected student haiku poems.

Guest Speaker:
Have a representative of a local leukemia organization come to speak about cancer awareness and prevention.


Cross-Curricular Extensions
Language Arts
Students can utilize the Maryland Public Television Club Write: Poetry video to inspire them to read and write other forms of poetry. Access MPT's instructional video service from /classroom/mediacenter/instrvideoserv.tp


Fine Arts
Students can explore further the art of paper folding. Students can learn to fold a variety of other animals.

Students can take their haiku and write it on a piece of poster paper.  They can then illustrate the poem. 


Science
Students can study other effects of radiation on human health. More information can be found at the Web site for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation at http://www.rerf.or.jp/eigo/radefx/late/leukemia.htm


Social Studies
Students can study the events that led up to the bombing of Hiroshima. More information can be found at http://www.lclark.edu/~history/HIROSHIMA/


Technology
Students can create a PowerPoint presentation describing all that they have learned from this lesson.


Stage 4
Teacher Reflection


As a reflective practitioner, note how this lesson could be adjusted after its initial
implementation. How successful were the students? What did the assessment demonstrate
about the students’ learning?  What skills do the students need to revisit?  What
instructional strategies worked and what made them successful?  What will you change
the next time you use this lesson?  Why? 

Author: Felicity Messner Ross and Douglas Fireside
Modified by: Mike Brown